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The Woodworker: Volume I

The Woodworker: Volume I

  • 5850


There is little doubt that Charles H. Hayward (1898-1998) was the most important workshop writer and editor of the 20th century.  Hayward was a trained cabinetmaker and extraordinary illustrator, not to mention an excellent designer, writer, editor and photographer, who left a legacy for woodworkers.

As editor of The Woodworker magazine from 1939 to 1967, Hayward oversaw the transformation of the craft from one that was almost entirely hand-tool based to one where machines had displaced the handplanes, chisels and backsaws of Hayward’s training and youth.

Lost Art Press undertook the collection, scanning, resetting and cleaning up of Haywood's articles; a project which took eight years, and many hands.  This massive project – offered in two volumes totalling 888 pages in all – seeks to reprint a small part of the information Hayward published in The Woodworker during his time as editor in chief. This is information that hasn’t been seen or read in decades. No matter where you are in the craft, from a complete novice to a professional, you will find information here you cannot get anywhere else.

The first volume is on tools and the second is on techniques. 

Volume I: Tools

Sharpening
Setting Out Tools & Chisels
Planes
Saws
Boring Tools
Carving
Turning
Veneering & Inlay


Like all Lost Art Press books, “The Woodworker: The Charles Hayward Years” is produced and printed entirely in the United States. It is printed on smooth acid-free #60 paper and joined with a tough binding that is sewn, affixed with fiber tape and then glued. The pages are covered in dense hardbound covers that are wrapped with cotton cloth.

 


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